Any computer user who has ever placed a call to a support hotline knows the difference between a quality support experience and, well, the opposite. But what does quality support really mean?  Let’s start by talking about what it isn’t. How many of us have…

  • called a support line, only to be greeted by an automated attendant which forces us to enter a 30-digit account number, then transfers us to a person whose first question is “please tell me your account number?” That’s not quality support.
  • had to press 1 for English, 2 to select our time zone, 3 to indicate we have a question, 7 if our computer is turned on, then 8 if it was built before 1975? That’s not quality support.
  • painstakingly explained our problem or question, then had our call escalated to a new person who immediately asks us “ok, so how can I help you today”, forcing us repeat the same conversation all over again? That’s not quality support.
  • been told by an automated attendant “Congratulations, you are now caller 213 in the queue. Your estimated hold time is hope-you-brought-a-good-book.” That’s not quality support.

 

You get the idea. I’ve worked in software support for over 20 years and have learned that you simply cannot overstate the importance of access to a quality support department. No matter how intuitive your software package may be, no matter how well versed you are in its use, no matter how stable and reliable it’s proven to be, there will always be those occasions when you just… need… help. And sometimes, when you need help, you’re in no mood to mess around. You need an answer, or an assist, and fast.

 

Maybe there’s a new feature you just can’t figure out on your own. Maybe your virus software was updated last night and now nothing works. Maybe you want to use the software to do something you just don’t do every day, and you need a quick refresher. Maybe you suspect a bug has crept into the software, and need a second set of eyes to confirm or deny your suspicions. These are all occasions when access to a quality support team plays a key role, not only in making the most of your software investment, but also in avoiding frustration at critical times.

Here’s exactly what I expect when I need to call a technical support hotline and why I am proud of the team and the capabilities we have established at B2W.

  • I want to speak with a human, and fast. B2W Software’s average hold time is 35 seconds, and our call completion rate is over 99%.
  • I want to speak to someone who understands my question, is well trained, and who can solve my problem quickly. B2W Software’s average same-day-resolution is 92.3%, and our average support case life cycle from inception to resolution is well under four hours.
  • I want to be treated as though my question or problem is your one and only priority. B2W Software’s client support satisfaction rating is 99.3%.
  • My problems often can’t wait. I need to be able to reach someone regardless of time of day or day of week. B2W Software Support is accessible 24/7/365.
  • I don’t want to be read to from a script. The B2W Support team is highly trained and located in the United States. You won’t be speaking with Engineer #237-B. You’ll be speaking with Russ, Karen, Jake or one of our many other highly trained support engineers who you’ll get to know by first name. They will treat you like a person and help you like a friend.
  • Sometimes, I honestly don’t feel like talking to anyone, but still need a way to communicate an issue, to check on the status of an existing issue, to obtain the latest downloads, or maybe even enter an idea for something I feel would make the software even better. Yes, this is a shameless plug for the B2W Community Portal.

 

Estimating and operational software applications are mission critical for construction enterprises, and it’s essential to partner with a software supplier that understands the importance of a quality support experience. Quality support. It’s how we roll at B2W Software. We welcome all opportunities to prove this to you and we look forward to hearing from you.

Jeff Pankratz